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Control Engineering Practice Award

The Control Engineering Practice Award is given to one individual or one team to be selected from those nominated for significant contribution to the advancement of control practice. The primary criterion for selection will be for the application and implementation of innovative control concepts, methodology, and technology, for the planning, design, manufacture, and operation of control systems. Achievement and usefulness will be evidenced by the benefit to society and by the degree of acceptance by those who use control as a tool. The work on which the nomination is based must have been performed while the nominated individual or at least one member of the team was a resident of the USA. The award consists of a certificate and an honorarium. In the event that the winner is a team, each member of the team will receive a certificate and the honorarium will be divided equally among the team members.

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2017: Lucy Y. Pao
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering applications of advanced control to wind turbines and wind farms

Biography:

Lucy Pao is a Professor in the Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering Department at the University of Colorado Boulder in the USA. She has completed sabbaticals at Harvard University (2001-2002), the University of California, Berkeley (2008), the US National Renewable Energy Laboratory (2009), the Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg Institute for Advanced Study in Delmenhorst, Germany (2016-2017) and the ForWind Center for Wind Energy Research at Oldenburg University, Germany (2016-2017). She earned B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. Her research has primarily focused on combined feedforward and feedback control of flexible structures, with applications ranging from atomic force microscopy to disk drives to digital tape drives to megawatt wind turbines and wind farms. She is a Fellow of the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). Selected recent awards include the 2012 IEEE Control Systems Magazine Outstanding Paper Award (with K. Johnson), the 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) Journal on Control and Optimization Best Paper Prize (with J. Marden and H. P. Young), and the Scientific Award 2017 from the European Academy of Wind Energy. Selected professional society activities include being a Fellow of the Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute (2009-present), General Chair of the 2013 American Control Conference, member of the IEEE Control Systems Society (CSS) Board of Governors (2011-2013 and 2015), IEEE CSS Fellow Nominations Chair (2016-present), and member of the IFAC Executive Board (2017-2020). In her free time, she enjoys reading, baking, biking, running, playing the piano, and travelling with her family. She and her husband have two children who now attend Stanford University.

2016: Mrdjan Jankovic
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For contributions to vehicle fuel economy and emission improvements using advanced control methods

Biography:

Mrdjan Jankovic received a bachelor degree from Belgrade University (1986), and masters and doctoral degrees from Washington University in St. Louis (1989 and 1992). He held postdoctoral positions with Washington University and University of California, Santa Barbara. He has joined Ford Research in 1995 where he is currently a Senior Technical Leader in the Control Engineering organization. His responsibilities include project management, mentoring and supervision of technical staff, and direct technical contribution to development of engine and after-treatment control systems. Dr. Jankovic’s research interests include automotive engine optimization and control, nonlinear control, and time-delay systems. He has coauthored one book (Constructive Nonlinear Control, Springer-Verlag, 1997), four book chapters, more than 100 external papers and more than 30 internal reports. He is a co-inventor on 57 US patents, 17 of which are used in Ford products sold world-wide. He served on the Editorial Board of the IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology (1997-2005) and on a number of award and program committees for IEEE, AACC, SAE, and IFAC. Dr. Jankovic received several awards including IEEE Control Systems Technology Award, two Ford Research Technical Achievement Awards, SAE Arch T. Colwell Merit Award, and IEEE TCST Outstanding Paper Award. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

 

2015: Francis J. Doyle III
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering the enabling technology of automatic control for systems biology and biomedical devices, specifically the foundational accomplishments for development of the artificial pancreas

Biography:

FRANCIS J. DOYLE III is the John A. Paulson Dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University, where he also is the John A. & Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor. Prior to that he was the Mellichamp Professor at UC Santa Barbara, where he was the Chair of the Department of Chemical Engineering, the Director of the UCSB/MIT/Caltech Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, and the Associate Dean for Research in the College of Engineering. He received a B.S.E. degree from Princeton, C.P.G.S. from Cambridge, and Ph.D. from Caltech, all in Chemical Engineering. He has also held faculty appointments at Purdue University and the University of Delaware, and held visiting positions at DuPont, Weyerhaeuser, and Stuttgart University. He is the recipient of several research awards (including the NSF National Young Investigator, ONR Young Investigator, Humboldt Research Fellowship, and the AIChE/CAST Computing in Chemical Engineering Award) as well as teaching awards (including the Purdue Potter Award, the ASEE Ray Fahien Award, the ASEE Chemstations Lectureship Award, and the AIChE/CAST David Himmelblau Award). He is a Fellow of multiple professional societies including IEEE, IFAC, AIMBE, and AAAS. He is the President-elect of the IEEE Control Systems Society, and is Vice President and Chair of the Technical Board for IFAC. His research interests are in systems biology, network science, modeling and analysis of circadian rhythms, drug delivery for diabetes, and model-based control. Outside of work he enjoys refereeing soccer, racing sailboats, and spending time with his wife Diana and 3 kids (Sara, Brianna, and Frankie).
 
 

2014: No recipient
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

2013: Hongtei Eric Tseng
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For original applications of advanced and classical estimation and control theory to automotive industry

Biography:

Hongtei Eric Tseng received the B.S. degree from National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan in 1986. He received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley in 1991 and 1994, respectively, all in Mechanical Engineering.

Since he joined Ford Motor Company in 1994, he has contributed to a number of technologies that lead to production vehicle implementation, including vehicle state estimation for Ford’s Roll Stability Control system (RSC) which is implemented on both Ford and Volvo vehicles; the design/development of fault detection on Ford’s engine only traction control and AdvanceTrac systems. His research work includes a low pressure tire warning system using wheel speed sensors; traction control; electronic stability control, and interactive vehicle dynamics control; real-time interactive powertrain control emulation through a motion based vehicle simulator; engine and transmission coordination control to improve shift feel; real-time model predictive control for vehicle applications in automated evasive maneuvers. His technical achievement at Ford has been recognized with Henry Ford Technical Fellow Award in 2004, 2010, and 2011. His current interest includes both powertrain and vehicle dynamics control. He is currently a Technical Leader in Controls Engineering at Research and Innovation Center, Ford Motor Company.

Eric has numerous patents and is the author/coauthor of over 70 publications including chapters in two handbooks (The Control Handbook, 2nd edition, and Road and Off-road Vehicle System Dynamics Handbook). He was the recipient of the Best Paper Award from 2012 International Conference on Bond Graph Modeling, and the Best Paper Award from International Symposium of Advanced Vehicle Control (AVEC) in 2006 and 2010. He has been a member of the AVEC International Science Committee since 2010 and a member of International Federation of Automotive Control (IFAC) Technical Committee since 2007.

 

2012: Eugene Lavretsky
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
Contributions to the development and transitioning of adaptive controls technologies to advanced flight controls

Biography:

Eugene Lavretsky is a Boeing Senior Technical Fellow, working at the Boeing Research & Technology in Huntington Beach, CA. During his career at Boeing, Dr. Lavretsky has developed flight control methods, system identification tools, and flight simulation technologies for transport aircraft, advanced unmanned aerial platforms, and weapon systems. Highlights include the MD-11 aircraft, NASA F/A-18 Autonomous Formation Flight and High Speed Civil Transport aircraft, JDAM guided munitions, X-45 and Phantom Ray autonomous aircraft, High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) hydrogenpowered aircraft, and VULTURE solar-powered unmanned aerial vehicle. His research interests include robust and adaptive control, system identification and flight dynamics. He has written over 100 technical articles, and has taught graduate control courses at the California Long Beach State University, Claremont Graduate University, California Institute of Technology, University of Missouri Science and Technology, and at the University of Southern California. Dr. Lavretsky is an Associate Fellow of AIAA and a Senior Member of IEEE. He is the recipient of the AIAA Mechanics and Control of Flight Award (2009) and the IEEE Control System Magazine Outstanding Paper Award (2011).

2011: Steven E. Shladover
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For original contributions to control practice in intelligent highway and vehicle systems

Biography:

Steven E. Shladover, Sc.D. Dr. Steven Shladover is a Research Engineer at the California PATH Program of the Institute of Transportation Studies of the University of California at Berkeley, where he leads the PATH research activities related to vehicle automation systems. He joined the PATH Program in 1989, after eleven years at Systems Control, Inc. and Systems Control Technology, Inc., where he was leading the company’s efforts in transportation systems engineering and computer-aided control engineering software products. Dr. Shladover received all of his degrees in mechanical engineering, with a specialization in dynamic systems and control, from M.I.T., where he began conducting research on vehicle automation in 1973. He also satisfied the course requirements for a doctorate in transportation systems at M.I.T., acquiring a thorough understanding of transportation system planning, modeling and evaluation. He has been active in ASME (former Chairman of the Dynamic Systems and Control Division), SAE (ITS Division) and the Transportation Research Board (Chairman of the standing committee on Intelligent Transportation Systems from 2004-2010, and member of the Committee on Vehicle- Highway Automation from its founding until 2010), and was the chairman of the Advanced Vehicle Control and Safety Systems Committee of the Intelligent Transportation Society of America from its founding in 1991 until 1997. Dr. Shladover leads the U.S. delegation to ISO/TC204/WG14, which is developing international standards for “vehicle-roadway warning and control systems”. He was the recipient of the Charles Stark Draper Innovative Practice Award from the ASME Dynamic Systems and Control Division in 2008.

Dr. Shladover has been working on vehicle-vehicle and vehicle-infrastructure cooperative intelligent transportation systems for most of his career, combining simulation, development and testing of the technological elements with broader evaluation of their applications to solving transportation problems. He led PATH’s work in the National Automated Highway Systems Consortium (NAHSC), which applied vehicle-vehicle and vehicle-infrastructure cooperative systems to support automated vehicle driving, including a high-visibility public demonstration. In recent years, Dr. Shladover has been developing intersection collision warning systems, cooperative adaptive cruise control systems and automated truck platooning systems. He has served on several special study committees developing recommendations for the National Research Council on intelligent transportation systems and unmanned ground vehicles. He has also been very active internationally, including a three-month Visiting Professor appointment at the Center for Collaborative Research at the University of Tokyo.

2010: Joseph Z. Lu
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For innovation in advanced control and optimization with sustained impact on the process industries

Biography:

Joseph Zhuxin Lu received his B.Sc, M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Zhejiang University in 1981, Beijing Institute of Technology in 1985, and University of Washington in 1990, respectively.  He joined Honeywell in 1990, held various research and development roles, and is currently Chief Scientist and Senior Fellow at Process Solutions business unit.

At Honeywell, Dr. Lu’s research interest has been in the areas of advanced control and optimization for process industries. His contribution to model predictive range control (MPRC) provided a unification of regulatory control, constraint control, and maneuvering control, which are the most common control problems in process industries. Process optimization is then restated as a form of maneuvering control.

Model predictive range control (MPRC) has provided a foundation for a number of Honeywell’s commercial multivariable control and optimization products, including Profit Controller, Profit Optimizer, and Profit Loop. To date, more than 2600 multivariable MPRC applications have been commissioned worldwide in process industries (such as refining, petrochemical, oil & gas, coal gasification, polymer, pulp & paper, and aluminum) and, more recently, in some non-process industries (such as semiconductor, dairy products, and car painting). These installations include more than 2500 unit-level multivariable controllers and more than 100 multi-unit or plantwide dynamic real-time optimization applications (many with lifespans extending more than 10 years). Additionally, an embedded version of the MRPC algorithm for single-loop MPC control is provided with every Experion Process Knowledge System as a widely embraced PID replacement option, and more than 28,000 licensed copies of Profit Loop have been sold/released.

Dr. Lu is a member of IEEE and AIChE. He resides with his wife and two children in Phoenix, Arizona.

2009: Suresh M. Joshi
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to control systems analysis and synthesis methodologies for advanced aerospace vehicles and systems

Biography:

Suresh M. Joshi is Senior Scientist for Control Theory at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. He received his BS and MS degrees from India (Banaras University and IIT-Kanpur) and his PhD in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (1973).

His main research interests have been various aspects of multivariable control theory and design with applications to advanced aerospace vehicles and systems. Some of his research contributions include: novel decoupled control laws for space-based high-precision pointing systems; fundamental theory and design methods for robust attitude control and vibration suppression for flexible spacecraft; control methods for robustly stable closed-loop maneuvering of nonlinear multibody flexible spacecraft; control of dynamic systems in the presence of actuator and sensor nonlinearities; active noise control methods; and more recently, adaptive control methods for dynamic systems in the presence of anomalies and failures with application to aircraft. He also served as a key technical leader in NASA’s Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) program, which incorporated his dissipativity-based robust control design methods to produce an integrated control-structure design methodology for optimal spacecraft design. In addition to control systems, his technical interests also include digital signal processing, digital communications, target tracking, and active control of noise.

Joshi is the author/coauthor of over 200 publications including 3 books in control engineering and aerospace applications. He is a Fellow of the IEEE (1993), the AIAA (1994), and the ASME (1998), and a recipient of the IEEE Control System Technology Award (1995), IEEE Judith A. Resnik Award (2003), ASME-DSCD Charles S. Draper Innovative Practice Award (2006), and IEEE Region 3 (Southeastern US) Outstanding Engineer Award (2007). He is also an amateur cartoonist and contributed the “Out of Control” cartoons to the IEEE Control Systems Magazine form 1985 until 1994.

2008: Babatunde A. Ogunnaike
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering the application and implementation of model predictive control, nonlinear state estimation, nonlinear control, and product control to polymer and granulation processes

Biography:

Babatunde A. (“Tunde”) Ogunnaike received the B.Sc. degree (with First Class Honors) in Chemical Engineering from the University of Lagos, Nigeria, in 1976; the M.S. degree, in Statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1981; and the Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering also from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981. From 1981 to 1982, he was a Research Engineer with the Process Control group of the Shell Development Corporation in Houston, Texas; and from 1982 to 1988, he was a professor at the University of Lagos with joint appointments in the Chemical Engineering and the Statistics Departments. He joined the Advanced Control and Optimization group of DuPont Central Science and Engineering in 1989, and was, from 1995 until September 2002, a Research Fellow in DuPont Chemical Sciences and Engineering. An adjunct professor in the Chemical Engineering Department of the University of Delaware since 1989, he joined the faculty as a full professor in September 2002 and was named the William L. Friend professor of Chemical Engineering in Jan 2004.  He is the author or co-author of three books including a widely used textbook, Process Dynamics, Modeling and Control, published in 1994 by Oxford University Press; he is also an Associate Editor of the journal Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Research.

Dr. Ogunnaike's research interests include modeling and control of industrial processes (polymer reactors, extruders, distillation columns); the application of process analytical technology for control of pharmaceutical processes; identification and control of nonlinear systems; the interaction of process design and process operability; applied statistics; biological control systems; and systems biology with application to neuronal responses and cancer.  He is the recipient of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers 1998 CAST Computing Practice Award, the 2004 University of Delaware’s College of Engineering Excellence in Teaching award, and ISA’s 2007 Eckman Award.

2007: Kevin Wise
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering contributions in the use of optimal and robust adaptive control design methodologies for unmanned aircraft and advanced weapon systems

Biography:

Kevin A. Wise was born in Champaign, IL on Nov. 10, 1956. He received the B.S. (1980), M.S. (1982), and Ph.D. (1987) degrees in ME from the University of Illinois-UC. Dr. Wise joined McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company in June 1982, and has been actively involved in the application of modern estimation and control methodologies in guidance, navigation, and flight control problems. Dr Wise is currently Senior Technical Fellow, Advanced Flight Controls, in The Boeing Company. He has developed flight control systems using optimal and adaptive control theories for manned and unmanned fighter aircraft, UAVs, missiles, advanced weapons, and ejection seats.

Dr. Wise has pioneered the use of optimal control theory at Boeing, personally developing a toolset that automates the design of command tracking optimal controllers over the flight envelope. The design tool, called AUTOGAIN, uses a robust servomechanism LQR with state feedback and then projects the state feedback design into an output feedback implementation, eliminating sensors in the implementation. His tools and designs have become the standard for weapons programs since 1990, and include the optimal control of the aerodynamically unstable X-45A Joint-Unmanned Combat Air System (J-UCAS).

Dr. Wise has also led the development and transition of model reference adaptive control in aircraft and weapons systems, using adaptive control to augment both optimal and dynamic inversion baseline controls. These adaptive systems have flown on the X-36 aircraft, MK-84 and MK-82 JDAM, and Laser-JDAM, and are now being used in production.

Dr. Wise has authored more than 60 technical articles, and teaches graduate level control theory at Washington University in St. Louis, Southern Illinois University at Edwardsville, and at the University of Missouri – Rolla graduate extension in St. Louis. Dr. Wise is a Senior Member of the IEEE, and an Associate Fellow of the AIAA.

2006: David S. Bayard
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For fundamental and innovative contributions to spacecraft control systems, including technical leadership on the precision pointing system for the Spitzer Space Telescope

Biography:

David S. Bayard received his B.A. degree in mathematics from Queens College of the City University of New York in 1977, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1979 and 1984, respectively. He is currently is a Senior Research Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

At JPL, Dr. Bayard has been involved in the application of modern estimation and control techniques to a wide range of emerging spacecraft and planetary missions, including the control of large space structures, Mars entry guidance and control, space telescope pointing (Spitzer), state estimation for a robotic balloon, reaction wheel control (Europa orbiter), control of a formation flying telescope (GEOTEL), attitude reconstruction for the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), rendezvous and docking (ST6), optical control of a space interferometer (SIM), and autonomous GN&C for small body exploration (asteroids and comets). Dr. Bayard's research interests include stochastic and adaptive control, system identification, robust control, dynamic programming/optimization, spacecraft control, and control of large flexible structures. His work in these fields span over 20 years of both theoretical and applications-oriented contributions, and includes over 130 papers in refereed journals and conferences, 43 NASA Tech Brief articles, and 3 U.S. patents.

Over the period from 1996-2003, Dr. Bayard developed advanced algorithms for attitude estimation, autonomous calibration and precision pointing of the NASA/JPL Spitzer Space Telescope. These efforts have been widely recognized as contributing significantly to both the quality and quantity of Spitzer mission science data return. Dr. Bayard served as an Associate Editor for the IEEE Transactions on Control System Technology, and on the AIAA Technical Committee on Multi-Disciplinary Optimization. He received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for autonomous spacecraft control, the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for contributions to the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission, and the NASA Exceptional Engineering Achievement Medal for contributions to the Spitzer Space Telescope. Dr. Bayard is a member of IEEE, SIAM, AIAA, Phi Beta Kappa and Beta Delta Chi.

2005: George W. Meyer
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For outstanding achievement in the development of feedback linearization and its application to aerospace systems

Biography:

George Meyer received the degrees of B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., all in Electrical Engineering, and all from the University of California at Berkeley. He has been employed by the NASA Ames Research Center since 1963. His research focused on spacecraft attitude control, aircraft flight control, and currently, on air traffic control. The research is typically done in collaboration with several universities through university research grants. He received awards from NASA and IEEE for his contributions to the nonlinear control theory. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

2004: William F. Powers
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering contributions to aerospace and automotive controls, ranging from very effective Space Shuttle controls to some of the first successful applications of optimal control and estimation in automotive industry

Biography:

William F. Powers retired as Vice President - Research from Ford Motor Company on December 31, 2000; he had been with the company since 1979. During his career at Ford, he served in numerous information technology, product development, and research management positions. On February 1, 1996, Dr. Powers assumed the responsibilities of Vice President-Research. Dr. Powers received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in 1963 from the University of Florida, and his Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics in 1968 from the University of Texas at Austin. At NASA Marshall Space Flight Center from 1960-65, he was involved with the development of the Saturn Booster guidance system and Apollo mission analyses. He consulted on the Space Shuttle Program with the NASA Johnson Space Center during the period 1970-79. From 1968-1980, he was a Professor of Aerospace Engineering and Computer, Information and Control Engineering at the University of Michigan. He served as President of the AACC in 1988-89 and he organized and was the first chairman of the IFAC Automotive Technical Committee.

He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Society of Automotive Engineers, and a foreign member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences. He currently is a consultant to a number of companies, and serves on the Secretary of Energy's Laboratory Operations Board, the National Academy of Engineering's Committee on Membership, the National Academies Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, and the National Academies Committee on Alternatives and Strategies for Future Hydrogen Production and Use, in addition to a number of university advisory committees. He and his wife, Linda, reside in Boca Raton and Ann Arbor, and have two children and three grandchildren.

2003: Edgar Bristol
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering contributions to the relative gain array, pattern recognition, and adaptive control,and their innovative application to industrial process control

Biography:

Edgar H. Bristol is a graduate of MIT and Beloit College in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. He career has spanned some forty years at the Foxboro Co., where he is now resisting retirement (http://homepage.mac.com/ebristol/). He has authored over 100 papers and has numerous patents in control, adaptive control, multivariable control, and control software. He has participated in a number of Process Control Standards efforts dating back to the beginning of the "Purdue Workshop".

He is the originator of RGA analysis and pattern recognition based adaptive control, for which he received the IEEE Control Technology Award and similar AICh and ISA awards. He is currently a fellow of the ISA, and a current or past member of the IEEE, AIChE, ACM, and MAA, and is active nationally and locally in a number of groups within these organizations.

2002: Dagfinn Gangsaas
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For pioneering contributions to the development and usage of highly-effective multivariable control design methods in the aerospace industry

Biography:

Dagfinn Gangsaas earned the B.Sc. degree with Honors in Aeronautical Engineering from University of Glasgow in 1967 and the M.S. degree in Aeronautics and Astronautics from University of Washington in 1974. He is currently an independent consultant in aircraft flight control.

During 31 years with the Boeing Company he held a wide range of engineering and management positions in research, development and implementation of flight control systems for commercial and military aircraft. Early in his career he worked in aircraft flight mechanics and the design and flight testing of the .rst digital fly-by-wire systems at Boeing (YC-14). In subsequent assignments he pioneered the successful practical application of linear quadratic synthesis techniques to several research aircraft, the Boeing 767, the Boeing Joint Strike Fighter, and the Darkstar autonomous aircraft; these techniques are currently being applied to the Embraer 170/190 family of regional jets. He conducted and directed research into highly integrated flight, propulsion and utilities control system architectures with applications of photonics technology, automated computer-aided control system design tools, flight trajectory optimization, adaptive control, flying qualities, reliability and failure analysis, failure detection and redundancy management, and advanced hydro-mechanical and electrical actuation systems. He directed the early development of the integrated flight and propulsion control systems for Navy, Marine and Air Force versions of Boeing’s entry into the competition for the Joint Strike Fighter. Following the crash of the Darkstar autonomous aircraft he led the redesign of the flight control and other systems which led to the successful resumption of flight testing of this very challenging aircraft. During his last assignment with Boeing he co-chaired the joint FAA and Boeing 737 Rudder Control System Independent Investigation Board. Mr. Gangsaas has three United States patents and over 20 publications. Of particular note are: Wind Models for Flight Simulator Certification of Landing and ApproachGuidanc e and Control Systems (adopted as a standard for atmospheric wind and turbulence simulation models); Application of Modern Synthesis to Aircraft Control: Three Case Studies (IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Outstanding Paper of the Year Award for 1986); and Control Law Design For Aircraft Using Multivariable Techniques (International Journal of Control, included as a chapter in the book Advances in Aircraft Flight Control, Mark Tischler, ed., 1996).

Mr. Gangsaas has been a Visiting Fellow to the Australian National University, a past Director, Officer and President of the American Automatic Control Council, past member of the AIAA Guidance, Navigation and Control and the SAE Aerospace, Guidance and Control committees, Associate Fellow of the AIAA, General Chairman of the 1990 ACC and the 1983 AIAA GNC conferences, and past Chairman of the Boeing Inter-Division Flight Control Technology Group.

2001: Warren A. Thompson
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

2000: F. Greg Shinskey
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

1999: D.D. Hrovat
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to innovative practice of control engineering in the design of automotive control systems, encompassing transmission, engine, active suspension and traction controls employed in thousands of automobiles worldwide

1998: Charlie R. Cutler
Recipient of Control Engineering Practice Award