John R. Ragazzini Education Award

The Ragazzini Award is given to recognize outstanding contributions to automatic control education in any form. These contributions can be from any source and in any media, i.e., electronic, publications, courses, etc.

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2014: Roger Brockett
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For inspirational mentorship of generations of graduate students who have participated in defining the field of control engineering

Biography:

Roger Brockett is An Wang research professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Harvard University.  He was a student at Case Institute of Technology and did his Ph.D. work under the supervision of Mihajlo D. Mesarovic, in the Systems Research Center then led by Donald P. Eckman.   Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1969, he taught for six years in the Electrical Engineering department at MIT, where he developed the textbook Finite Dimensional Linear Systems and involved graduate students in a range of topics centering on stability theory and applications.  At Harvard, working along side of Y.C. Ho and an outstanding group of younger colleagues, he initially focused on the theory and applications of nonlinear systems emphasizing the use of differential geometric ideas.  In the mid 1980s, fostered in part by the new NSF Engineering Research Center imitative and the ARO MURI program administered by Jagdish Chandra, the focus of his research turned to the application of control theoretic ideas to problems in robotics, computer vision and other aspects of intelligent machines.  An important part of this transition was the development of a broadly inclusive robotics laboratory, engaging a number of Harvard faculty members as well as involving, long-term collaborations with colleagues and former students at Brown University, the University of Maryland, and MIT.  His teaching has involved the development of courses for engineering students, ranging from a freshman design course to graduate level teaching across the field of control.  His Ph.D. students and post doctoral researchers have, in many cases, gone on to become leaders in the field with their accomplishments being recognized, not only through their “day jobs” as teachers, researchers and managers, but also through their participation in the operation and editorial processes of some of the participating societies of the ACC.

2013: Mathukumalli Vidyasagar
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to automatic control education through publication of textbooks and research monographs

Biography:

Mathukumalli Vidyasagar was born in Guntur, India on September 29, 1947. He received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, in 1965, 1967 and 1969 respectively. Between 1969 and 1989, he was a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Marquette University, Milwaukee (1969-70), Concordia University, Montreal (1970-80), and the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada (1980-89). In 1989 he returned to India as the Director of the newly created Centre for Artificial Intelligence and Robotics (CAIR) in Bangalore, under the Ministry of Defence, Government of India. Between 1989 and 2000, he built up CAIR into a leading research laboratory with about 40 scientists and a total of about 85 persons, working in areas such as flight control, robotics, neural networks, and image processing. In 2000 he moved to the Indian private sector as an Executive Vice President of India's largest software company, Tata Consultancy Services. In the city of Hyderabad, he created the Advanced Technology Center, an industrial R&D laboratory of around 80 engineers, working in areas such as computational biology, quantitative finance, e-security, identity management, and open source software to support Indian languages.

In 2009 he retired from TCS and joined the Erik Jonsson School of Engineering & Computer Science at the University of Texas at Dallas, as a Cecil & Ida Green Chair in Systems Biology Science. In March 2010 he was named as the Founding Head of the newly created Bioengineering Department. His current research interests are in the application of stochastic processes and stochastic modeling to problems in computational biology, and control systems.

Vidyasagar has received a number of awards in recognition of his research contributions, including Fellowship in The Royal Society, the world's oldest scientific academy in continuous existence, the IEEE Control Systems (Field) Award, the Rufus Oldenburger Medal of ASME, and others. He is the author of ten books and nearly 140 papers in peer-reviewed journals.

2011: James B. Rawlings
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to automatic control education through powerful fundamental research, tutorial papers, and a comprehensive textbook

Biography:

James B. Rawlings is currently Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the University of Wisconsin. He received the B.S. from the University of Texas in 1979 and the Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin in 1985, both in Chemical Engineering. He spent one year at the University of Stuttgart as a NATO postdoctoral fellow and then joined the faculty at the University of Texas. He moved to the University of Wisconsin in 1995 and is currently the Paul A. Elfers Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering and the co-director of the Texas-Wisconsin-California Control Consortium (TWCCC).

Professor Rawlings's research interests are in the areas of chemical process modeling, monitoring and control, nonlinear model predictive control, moving horizon state estimation, and molecular-scale chemical reaction engineering, Professor Rawlings has written numerous research articles and coauthored two textbooks: "Model Predictive Control: Theory and Design" (2009), with David Mayne, and "Chemical Reactor Analysis and Design Fundamentals" (2004), with John Ekerdt. Professor Rawlings has taught numerous short courses on advanced state estimation and model predictive control at companies and universities.

In recognition of his research and teaching, Professor Rawlings has received "Doctor technices honoris causa" from the Danish Technical University; the inaugural High Impact Paper Award from the International Federation of Automatic Control; the Excellence in Process Development Award and the Computing in Chemical Engineering Award from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers; the Harvey Spangler Award for Technology Enhanced Instruction and the Byron Bird Award for Excellence in a Research Publication, from the University of Wisconsin; and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. Professor Rawlings was the Bayer Lecturer at Carnegie Mellon University (2010) and the Van Ness Lecturer at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (199) and is a Fellow of AIChE.

2010: Tzyh Jong Tarn
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For substantial contributions to control education through teaching, mentoring of graduate students, and research in control theory and applications to robotics

Biography:

Tzyh Jong Tarn is currently a Professor in the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering and the Director of the Center for Robotics and Automation at Washington University. He also is the director of the Center for Quantum Information Science and Technology at Tsinghua University, Beijing and the distinguished chair professor in the Department of Physics at National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan. An active member of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, Dr. Tarn served as the President of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society, 1992-1993, the Director of the IEEE Division X (Systems and Control), 1995-1996, and a member of the IEEE Board of Directors, 1995-1996.

He is the first recipient of the Nakamura Prize at the 10th Anniversary of IROS in Grenoble, France, 1997, the recipient of the prestigious Joseph F. Engelberger Award of the Robotic Industries Association in 1999, the Auto Soft Lifetime Achievement Award in 2000. He also is the recipient of Pioneer in Robotics and Automation Award in 2003, and the George Saridis Leadership Award in 2009, both from the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society. This year he was selected as a recipient of the Einstein Chair Professor Award from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. He was featured in the Special Report on Engineering of the 1998 Best Graduate School issue of U.S. News and World Report and his recent research accomplishments were reported in the Washington Times, the Financial Times (London), Le Monde (Paris), and the Chicago Sun-Times.  Dr. Tarn is an IEEE Fellow and an IFAC Fellow.

2009: George Stephanopoulos
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions in process control and systems engineering education through classroom teaching, textbook and monograph publication, and graduate student mentorship

Biography:

George Stephanopoulos is Arthur D. Little Professor of Chemical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received a Diploma in Chemical Engineering from the National Technical University of Athens in 1970, a Masters in Engineering degree from McMaster University in 1971, and a Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1974. Before joining MIT, George was a professor at the University of Minnesota and the National Technical University of Athens. From 2000-2005 he held various positions with the Mitsubishi Chemical Corporation including as Chief Technology Officer from 2000-2002. His research interests have spanned process design; process monitoring, diagnosis and control; data rectification; knowledge-based methods; multi-scale systems; and systems biology. George is the author or editor for more than 10 books, monographs, and collections, with his textbook on chemical process control available in English, Greek, and Chinese.

George’s professional service includes: (1) Program Chair for many systems and control meetings including the IFAC Symposium on Fault Diagnosis and Supervision; the IFAC Symposium on Intelligent Systems and Process Engineering; and the IFAC Symposium on Dynamics and Control of Process Systems; (2) American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Representative to the Board of Directors of the American Automatic Control Council; and (3) Director, Vice Chair, and Chair of the Computing and Systems Technology Division of AIChE. He was a consultant and member of the advisory board of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization. George’s accomplishments in research and education have been recognized by many honors and awards including the Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher and Scholar Award; the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award from the American Society for Engineering Education; the AIChE Allan P. Colburn Award for Excellence in Publications; the AIChE William H. Walker Award for Excellence in Contributions to the Chemical Engineering Literature; and membership in the National Academy of Engineering.

2008: Stephen Yurkovich
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For leadership in control education through curriculum and laboratory development, for contributions in continuing education for control engineers in industry, and for promotion of student involvement in engineering professionalism

Biography:

Stephen Yurkovich is a Fellow of the IEEE, and holds a joint appointment as Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering at The Ohio State University, where he served as Acting Director of the Center for Automotive Research in 2007. In 2000 he was awarded the IEEE Control Systems Society Distinguished Member Award, and an IEEE Third Millennium Medal. Professor Yurkovich has won numerous awards at Ohio State University for his research focused on the theory and applications of control systems, in numerous application areas. He has been an author on more than 180 technical publications in journals, edited volumes, and conference proceedings, and has authored and co-authored the books Control Laboratory (Kendall/Hunt, 1992), Fuzzy Control (1998, Addison-Wesley-Longman), and Control Systems Technology Lab (Pearson Custom Publishing, 2004).

In addition to research, Professor Yurkovich’s accomplishments span many facets of control education and education in general. As a direct result of working with many students he has mentored over his career, he has packaged and transferred knowledge on research and technology into public forums, into classroom instruction in the US and abroad, and to engineers in industry. He has taught in the area of control systems for more than 20 years, including courses and workshops abroad in Mexico, Costa Rica and Belgium, and has delivered various invited lectures on his research as well as on education-related topics. He has secured funding in the area of control education from the National Science Foundation and industry, and has undertaken significant curriculum development projects to bring research into the classroom. He has promoted control education in public venues through service in the IEEE Control Systems Society and through his editorial work in IEEE Control Systems Magazine where he initiated and led several education-related activities and special issues. He has been active in continuing education and distance education for industry for more than ten years while at Ohio State, defining and developing several Certificate programs with graduate courses in automotive systems, delivering a wide variety of short courses in control related fields, and developing focused control-related courses for Ohio State students as well as partners in industry. In 2007 he was awarded the General Motors Outstanding Distance Learning Faculty Award. He has also been a leader at Ohio State and in central Ohio in outreach programs from the university to high school students in promotion of engineering as a profession, in his position as Director of the Honda-OSU Partnership program.

2007: Manfred Morari
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions in control education through monographs, software, the establishment of control programs and the mentoring of a large number of outstanding graduate students

Biography:

Manfred Morari was appointed head of the Automatic Control Laboratory at ETH Zurich in 1994. Before that he was the McCollum-Corcoran Professor of Chemical Engineering and Executive Officer for Control and Dynamical Systems at the California Institute of Technology. He obtained the diploma from ETH Zurich and the Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota, both in chemical engineering. His interests are in predictive and robust control and hybrid systems with applications to the control of automotive, mechatronic and biomedical systems.

Professor Morari held visiting positions at Carnegie Mellon University and the University of California at Berkeley. He is the author of many research articles and co-authored / co-edited five books, among them Robust Process Control (with E. Zafiriou, 1989) and Hybrid systems: Computation and control (with L.Thiele, 2005). His publications are among the most widely cited in engineering according to ISIHighlyCited.com. For the design, analysis and implementation of controllers for constrained linear and hybrid systems, his research group has established the Multi-Parametric Toolbox, a software depository that includes the contributions of the major international groups working in these areas. The toolbox has enjoyed great popularity as is attested by the more than 8000 downloads recorded in three years.

Of the more than 50 doctoral and postdoctoral students Morari has supervised many have assumed positions of major responsibility in business or academia, more than 20 now hold academic positions in major universities around the world.

In recognition of his research contributions, he received numerous awards, among them the Donald P. Eckman Award of the Automatic Control Council, the Allan P. Colburn Award and the Professional Progress Award of the AIChE, the Curtis W. McGraw Research Award of the ASEE, Doctor Honoris Causa from Babes-Bolyai University, Fellow of IEEE, the IEEE Control Systems Field Award, and was elected to the National Academy of Engineering (U.S.). Professor Morari has held appointments with Exxon and ICI plc and serves on the technical advisory board of several major corporations.

2006: Masayoshi Tomizuka
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Biography:

Masayoshi Tomizuka is the Cheryl and John Neerhout, Jr., DistinguishedProfessor of the College of Engineering, at the University of California, Berkeley.He was born in Tokyo, Japan in 1946. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees inMechanical Engineering from Keio University, Tokyo, Japan and his Ph. D. degreein Mechanical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 13 February 1974. He joined the faculty of the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley in 1974. At UC Berkeley, Professor Tomizuka teaches courses in dynamic systems and controls. He has supervised nearly 80 Ph. D. students to completion. His current research interests are mechatronics, optimal and adaptive control, digital control, signal rocessing, motion control, and control problems related to robotics, machining, manufacturing, information storage devices and vehicles. He served as Vice Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering in charge of instruction from 1989 to 1991, Vice Chair in charge of graduate studies from 1995 to 1996, and the Director of Engineering Systems Research Center from 1999 to 2002. From December, 1991 to August, 1992, he was the Visiting Toshiba Professor in Intelligent Mechatronics at the University of Tokyo. He has served as a consultant or an advisor for various organizations. He served as Program Director of the Dynamic Systems, Sensing, Modeling and Control Program at the National Science Foundation from Sept.2002 to Dec. 2004.

Professor Tomizuka has served as Senior Technical Editor of the ASME Journal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement and Control, J-DSMC (1988-93), Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics (1997-99) and Associate Editor of the Journal of the International Federation of Automatic Control, Automatica. He was General Chairman of the 1995 American Control Conference, and served as President of the American Automatic Control Council (1998-99). He is a Fellow of the ASME, the IEEE and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He has received several awards including the J-DSMC Best Paper Award (1995), the Pi Tau Sigma-ASME Charles Russ Richards Memorial Award (1997), and the Rufus Oldenburger Medal (2002). The Oldenburger Medal was awarded to him for his seminal contributions in the area of adaptive control, preview control and zerophase control, which have led design improvements in the control of mechanical motion including machine tools, disk drives and robotic systems.

2005: S. Shankar Sastry
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to education in adaptive, nonlinear and hybrid control systems, and robotics through mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students, development of textbooks, course materials, and experimental laboratories

Biography:

S. Shankar Sastry is currently the Director of CITRIS (Center forInformation Technology in the Interests of Society) an interdisciplinarycenter spanning UC Berkeley, Davis, Merced and SantaCruz. He served as Chairman, Department of Electrical Engineeringand Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley fromJanuary, 2001 through June 2004. In 2000, he served as Director ofthe Information Technology Office at DARPA. From 1996-1999, hewas the Director of the Electronics Research Laboratory at Berkeley,an organized research unit on the Berkeley campus conducting researchin computer sciences and all aspects of electrical engineering.He is the NEC Distinguished Professor of Electrical Engineering andComputer Sciences and a Professor of Bioengineering.

Dr. Sastry received his Ph.D. degree in 1981 from the University of California, Berkeley. He was on the faculty of MIT as Asst. Professor from 1980-82 and Harvard University as a chaired Gordon McKay professor in 1994. He has held visiting appointments at the Australian National University, Canberra the University of Rome, Scuola Normale and University of Pisa, the CNRS laboratory LAAS in Toulouse (poste rouge), Professor Invite at Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble (CNRS laboratory VERIMAG), and as a Vinton Hayes Visiting fellow at the Center for Intelligent Control Systems at
MIT. His areas of research are embedded and autonomous software, computer vision, computation
in novel substrates such as quantum computing, nonlinear and adaptive control, robotic telesurgery, control of hybrid systems, embedded systems, network embedded systems, sensor networks and biological motor control. Most recently he has been concerned with cybersecurityand critical infrastructure protection.

His most recent book “An Invitation to 3D Vision: From Images to Models” co-authored with Y. Ma, S. Soatto, and J. Kosecka was published by Springer Verlag in November 2003. Nonlinear Systems: Analysis, Stability and Control was published by Springer-Verlag in 1999. He has coauthored over 300 technical papers and 9 books, including Adaptive Control: Stability, Convergence and Robustness (with M. Bodson, Prentice Hall, 1989) and A Mathematical Introduction to Robotic Manipulation (with R. Murray and Z. Li, CRC Press, 1994). He has coedited Hybrid Control II, Hybrid Control IV and Hybrid Control V (with P. Antsaklis, A. Nerode, and W. Kohn, Springer Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 1995, 1997, and 1999, respectively) and co edited Hybrid Systems: Computation and Control (with T. Henzinger, Springer-Verlag Lecture Notes in Computer Science, 1998) and Essays in Mathematical
Robotics (with Baillieul and Sussmann, Springer-Verlag IMA Series). Dr. Sastry served as Associate Editor for numerous publications, including: IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control; IEEE Control Magazine; IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems; the Journal of Mathematical Systems, Estimation and Control; IMA Journal of Control and Information; the International Journal of Adaptive Control and Signal Processing; Journal of BiomimeticSystems and Materials.

Dr. Sastry was elected into the National Academy of Engineering in 2001 "for pioneering contributions to the design of hybrid and embedded systems." He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) in 2004. He is on the Air Force Science Board and is Chairman of the Board of the International Computer Science Institute. He is also a member of the boards of the Federation of American Scientists and ESCHER (Embedded Systems Consortium for Hybrid and Embedded Research). He also received the President of India Gold Medal in 1977, the IBM Faculty Development award for 1983-1985, the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985 and the Eckman Award of the American Automatic Control Council in 1990, an M. A. (honoris causa) from Harvard in 1994, Fellow of the IEEE in 1994, the distinguished Alumnus Award of the Indian Institute of Technology in 1999, and the David
Marr prize for the best paper at the International Conference in Computer Vision in 1999.

He has supervised over 50 doctoral students to completion and over 50 MS students. His students now occupy leadership roles in several locations and on the faculties of many major universities in the United States and abroad.

2004: Mark W. Spong
Recipient of John R. Ragazzini Education Award

Citation:
For outstanding contributions to control education through course, textbook, and laboratory development, and the invention and commercialization of innovative laboratory experiments

Biography:

Mark W. Spong is the Donald Biggar Willett Professor of Engineering, Professor of General Engineering, and Research Professor in the Coordinated Science Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.His current interests include nonlinear control theory, mechatronics, and robotics.He received the B.A. degree, magna cum laude and Phi Beta Kappa, in mathematics and physics from Hiram College in 1975, the M.S. degree in mathematics from New Mexico State University in 1977, and the M.S. and D.Sc. degrees in systems science and mathematics in 1979 and 1981, respectively, from Washington University in St. Louis.In 1984 he joined the faculty of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

At Illinois he is the Director of the College of Engineering Robotics and Automation Laboratory, which he founded in 1987, and Director of the John Deere Mechatronics Laboratory, which he founded in 1995.He has held Visiting Professorships at the University of Waterloo, Canada, the CINVESTAV del IPN, Mexico City,the Lund Institute of Technology,Sweden, the Laboratory of Automatic Control (LAG), Grenoble, France, the Technological University of Compiegne, France, the Katholiek University, Leuven, Belgium, The National University of Singapore, and the Technical University of Munich, Germany, and has served as a consultant to industry and government.

Professor Spong has received several awards including the Senior U.S. Scientist Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the O. Hugo Schuck Award from the American Automatic Control Council, the Distinguished Member Award from the IEEE Control Systems Society and the IEEE Third Millennium Medal. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and past Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Control System Technology.He served as Vice President for Publication Activities and a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Control Systems Society and is President-Elect of the Society for 2004.He has published over 170 technical articles in control and robotics and is co-author of two books, Robot Dynamics and Control,John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1989 (with M. Vidyasagar) and Robot Control: Dynamics, Motion Planning, and Analysis, IEEE Press, 1992 (with F. Lewis and C. Abdallah). In addition, he is President of Mechatronic Systems, Inc., a company that he founded in 1996 to produce and market innovative laboratory experiments for control systems research and education. The experimental devices that he invented, including the Pendubot and the Reaction Wheel Pendulum, are now in use at more than 100 universities and research laboratories in North and South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, and Australia.

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