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Control Engineering Practice Award

The Control Engineering Practice Award is given to one individual or one team to be selected from those nominated for significant contribution to the advancement of control practice. The primary criterion for selection will be for the application and implementation of innovative control concepts, methodology, and technology, for the planning, design, manufacture, and operation of control systems. Achievement and usefulness will be evidenced by the benefit to society and by the degree of acceptance by those who use control as a tool. The work on which the nomination is based must have been performed while the nominated individual or at least one member of the team was a resident of the USA. The award consists of a certificate and an honorarium. In the event that the winner is a team, each member of the team will receive a certificate and the honorarium will be divided equally among the team members.

D.D. Hrovat

Year: 
1999
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to innovative practice of control engineering in the design of automotive control systems, encompassing transmission, engine, active suspension and traction controls employed in thousands of automobiles worldwide

Suresh M. Joshi

Year: 
2009
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to control systems analysis and synthesis methodologies for advanced aerospace vehicles and systems

Suresh M. Joshi is Senior Scientist for Control Theory at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA. He received his BS and MS degrees from India (Banaras University and IIT-Kanpur) and his PhD in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (1973).

Kevin Wise

Year: 
2007
Citation: 
For pioneering contributions in the use of optimal and robust adaptive control design methodologies for unmanned aircraft and advanced weapon systems

Kevin A. Wise was born in Champaign, IL on Nov. 10, 1956. He received the B.S. (1980), M.S. (1982), and Ph.D. (1987) degrees in ME from the University of Illinois-UC. Dr. Wise joined McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company in June 1982, and has been actively involved in the application of modern estimation and control methodologies in guidance, navigation, and flight control problems. Dr Wise is currently Senior Technical Fellow, Advanced Flight Controls, in The Boeing Company.

David S. Bayard

Year: 
2006
Citation: 
For fundamental and innovative contributions to spacecraft control systems, including technical leadership on the precision pointing system for the Spitzer Space Telescope

David S. Bayard received his B.A. degree in mathematics from Queens College of the City University of New York in 1977, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1979 and 1984, respectively. He is currently is a Senior Research Scientist at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology.

William F. Powers

Year: 
2004
Citation: 
For pioneering contributions to aerospace and automotive controls, ranging from very effective Space Shuttle controls to some of the first successful applications of optimal control and estimation in automotive industry

William F. Powers retired as Vice President - Research from Ford Motor Company on December 31, 2000; he had been with the company since 1979. During his career at Ford, he served in numerous information technology, product development, and research management positions. On February 1, 1996, Dr. Powers assumed the responsibilities of Vice President-Research. Dr. Powers received his B.S. in Aerospace Engineering in 1963 from the University of Florida, and his Ph.D. in Engineering Mechanics in 1968 from the University of Texas at Austin.

George W. Meyer

Year: 
2005
Citation: 
For outstanding achievement in the development of feedback linearization and its application to aerospace systems

George Meyer received the degrees of B.S., M.S. and Ph.D., all in Electrical Engineering, and all from the University of California at Berkeley. He has been employed by the NASA Ames Research Center since 1963. His research focused on spacecraft attitude control, aircraft flight control, and currently, on air traffic control. The research is typically done in collaboration with several universities through university research grants. He received awards from NASA and IEEE for his contributions to the nonlinear control theory. He is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Babatunde A. Ogunnaike

Year: 
2008
Citation: 
For pioneering the application and implementation of model predictive control, nonlinear state estimation, nonlinear control, and product control to polymer and granulation processes

Babatunde A. (“Tunde”) Ogunnaike received the B.Sc. degree (with First Class Honors) in Chemical Engineering from the University of Lagos, Nigeria, in 1976; the M.S. degree, in Statistics from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in 1981; and the Ph.D. degree in Chemical Engineering also from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1981.

Edgar Bristol

Year: 
2003
Citation: 
For pioneering contributions to the relative gain array, pattern recognition, and adaptive control,and their innovative application to industrial process control

Edgar H. Bristol is a graduate of MIT and Beloit College in Electrical Engineering and Mathematics. He career has spanned some forty years at the Foxboro Co., where he is now resisting retirement (http://homepage.mac.com/ebristol/). He has authored over 100 papers and has numerous patents in control, adaptive control, multivariable control, and control software. He has participated in a number of Process Control Standards efforts dating back to the beginning of the "Purdue Workshop".

Control Engineering Practice Award

The Control Engineering Practice Award is given to one individual or one team to be selected from those nominated for significant contribution to the advancement of control practice. The primary criterion for selection will be for the application and implementation of innovative control concepts, methodology, and technology, for the planning, design, manufacture, and operation of control systems. Achievement and usefulness will be evidenced by the benefit to society and by the degree of acceptance by those who use control as a tool.

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