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John R. Ragazzini Education Award

The Ragazzini Award is given to recognize outstanding contributions to automatic control education in any form. These contributions can be from any source and in any media, i.e., electronic, publications, courses, etc.

Graham Goodwin

Year: 
2021
Citation: 
For extraordinary contributions to Control Engineering Education through numerous authored textbooks and through education leadership.

Graham Goodwin is an Emeritus Laureate Professor in Electrical Engineering at the University of Newcastle, Australia. He graduated from the University of New South Wales with B.Sc. (Physics), B.E. (Electrical Engineering) and Ph.D. in 1965, 1967 and 1971 respectively. In 2010 he was awarded the IEEE Control Systems Field Award and in 2013 he received the Rufus T. Oldenburger Medal from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

Naomi Leonard

Year: 
2020
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to control education through dedicated mentoring of undergraduate and graduate students, integration of research and education, and innovative curriculum development combining engineering and the arts.
Paper: 
Text of Acceptance Speech: 

Richard M. Murray

Year: 
2019
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to control engineering education via authorship of influential textbooks, mentorship of young engineers, and development of control programs
Paper: 
Thomas E. and Doris Everhart Professor
Control & Dynamical Systems and Bioengineering
California Institute of Technology
 
PhD in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, UC Berkeley
Fellow of IEEE
AACC Donald P. Eckman Award
IEEE Bode Lecture Prize
IEEE Control Systems Award
Member, National Academy of Engineering
Text of Acceptance Speech: 

Miroslav Krstić

Year: 
2017
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to textbook writing, industrial collaboration, and mentoring of students to enter the control field
Paper: 

Miroslav Krstić  is Distinguished Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, holds the Alspach endowed chair, and is the founding director of the Cymer Center for Control Systems and Dynamics at UC San Diego. He also serves as Associate Vice Chancellor for Research at UCSD.

Text of Acceptance Speech: 

Roger Brockett

Year: 
2014
Citation: 
For inspirational mentorship of generations of graduate students who have participated in defining the field of control engineering

Roger Brockett is An Wang research professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Harvard University.  He was a student at Case Institute of Technology and did his Ph.D. work under the supervision of Mihajlo D. Mesarovic, in the Systems Research Center then led by Donald P. Eckman.   Prior to joining the Harvard faculty in 1969, he taught for six years in the Electrical Engineering department at MIT, where he developed the textbook Finite Dimensional Linear Systems and involved graduate students in a range of topics centering on stability theory and applications.

Mathukumalli Vidyasagar

Year: 
2013
Citation: 
For outstanding contributions to automatic control education through publication of textbooks and research monographs

Mathukumalli Vidyasagar was born in Guntur, India on September 29, 1947. He received the B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, in 1965, 1967 and 1969 respectively. Between 1969 and 1989, he was a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Marquette University, Milwaukee (1969-70), Concordia University, Montreal (1970-80), and the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada (1980-89).

Gene F. Franklin

Year: 
1985
Citation: 
In recognition of outstanding contributions and distinguished leadership in automatic control education

Gene F. Franklin received the Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Georgia Tech in 1950 the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering from MIT in 1952, and the Doctor of Engineering Science degree in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University in 1955. He was appointed Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University from 1955-1957 and has been on the Faculty of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University since 1957 where he is now Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus.

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